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Visas & Work Permits

The following is a guide through some of the rules and regulations for each country. Some countries will be far more relaxed about enforcing these rules than others. If you are working for a tour operator abroad, they will be aware of the regulations and should sort out any permits and visas you may need. visas forski jobs
EU Countries
Any EU citizen working or travelling in another EU country does not need a visa or work permit.

The following countries require a residence permit if you are staying longer than 3 months: Germany, Italy, Spain.

You may also have to apply for further documentation in resort, so check with the authorities when you arrive.
Non-EU Countries
e.g Switzerland , Andorra

While most of these countries retain a degree of flexibility, watch out for Switzerland. Your employer will find you a visa, but make sure you have one! Try to make sure you know whether you visa will cover you for the whole season as many visas are only for three months. Those working illegally tend to be deported from the big resorts on a fairly regular basis.

N.B. Andorra: As Andorra does not have an airport you will need a valid passport allowing you to travel through France or Spain.
USA
British citizens do not need to apply for a tourist visa in advance any more.

You can fill in a visa waiver form at the airport that allows a maximum of three months in the country.

A B1/B2 visa will allow you to stay in the country for a maximum of six months, but does not allow you to work in 'gainful employment'.

A working visa or US/Canadian passport is required to work legally. British tour operators have to buy these, so they tend not to take risks with first timers and give these jobs to returning staff.

Some ski resorts in America employ international workers via the H-2B work visa. This visa is issued to a skilled or unskilled worker and is required by an employee who is coming to the United States to perform a job which is temporary or seasonal in nature and for which there is a shortage of U.S. workers. In order to obtain this visa, the employer must file paperwork with the USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services) and the Department of Labour on the employee’s behalf. This means that you need to secure your job first, and then apply for the work visa.

 Click here for a guide to USA visas.
Canada
Though you do not need to apply for a visa in advance, an Employment Authorisation document is required to allow you to work in the country.

A working visa or US/Canadian passport is required to work legally. British tour operators have to buy these, so they tend not to take risks with first timers and give these jobs to returning staff.

 Click here for a guide to Canadian work permits.